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eBay '200-Year Old' Kit, 2012



In February 2012 eBay featured this overpriced (and apparently fake - see below) kit attributed to Ernst Bloomberg. At 'over 200 years old,' this kit would have been manufactured before 1812, far before the canonical 'Ernst Blomberg period' or most interest in vampires. I don't think it will sell.

The seller's description reads:
Over 200- year-old VAMPIRE KILLING KIT, Museum Quality

$15,000


Extremely RARE Vampire Killing Kit created by Professor Blomberg in England in the 18th century, for people traveling to vampire infested countries in Eastern Europe for safety and protection from the "undead"! Kit inclues a pistoll with a large silver cross welded to the back of the pistol with the silver bullets included, which would provide protection from werewolves that were believed to be prevelant in that region. Kit also includes bottles of serum and a very large syringe that you would use to inject Professor Blomberg's secret serum directly into the wound to prevent becoming a vampire. It also includes a large wooden stake to impale the suspected vampire's heart and a large knife to cut off the vampire's head and stuff it with garlic. There is a small tin of flour of garlic in the kit.














The contents of these unusually labelled vials appear to be:
Holy Water
(unidentified small vial)
Powdered Flower of Garlic
Professor Blomberg's New Serum
Potassium Nitrate (this is a first)
Another bottle of the New Serum
Brimstone (Sulfur)
















While it is nice to see a Blomberg kit for sale again, there are immediate concerns regarding the authenticity of this kit and its professed age. For starters, the weld holding the gun barrel to the possibly cast iron crucifix looks sloppy and new - evidence of wear on the barrel, but superficial surface rust all over the cross (forget that this 'silver cross' is covered with rust). The sloppy collection of firearm accessories appear to be from the late 1800s (to my untrained eye).

The box appears to be oak with mitred corners fastened by finishing nails or brads - dovetailed corners would have been much more common in the early 19th century.

Oh, did I mention that the seller of this $15,000 antique has zero customer feedback? Who smells a desperate fake?

However, this is the first time I have seen detailed instructions for the proper use of Blomberg's serum, or individual vial labels featuring Blomberg's name so prominently. They also included a scrap of a page from an old German book for appearances.